Right Atrium 3D

  • Description:
    • * The right atrium is the right upper chamber of the heart.
    • * Receives venous blood from the whole body, pumps it to the right ventricle through the right atrioventricular or tricuspid opening.
    • * Forms the right border, part of the upper border, the sternocostal surface and base of the heart.
    • * Right atrial pressure is usually slightly lower than the left atrial pressure.
    • * Contains the valve of the IVC and the valve of the coronary sinus.

 

  • Right Auricle:
    • * It is the conical muscular pouch of the upper anterior portion of the right atrium, which covers the first part of the right coronary artery.

 

  • Sinus Venarum:
    • * It is a posteriorly situated, smooth-walled area that is separated from the more muscular atrium proper by the crista terminalis.
    • * Develops from the from the right horn of the sinus venosus and receives the SVC, IVC, coronary sinus, and anterior cardiac veins.

 

  • Pectinate Muscles​​​​​​​:
    • * Are prominent ridges of atrial myocardium located in the interior of both auricles and the right atrium.

 

  • Crista Terminalis​​​​​​​:
    • * Is a vertical muscular ridge running anteriorly along the right atrial wall from the opening of the SVC to the opening of the IVC, providing the origin of the pectinate muscles.
    • * Represents the junction between the primitive sinus venarum and the right atrium proper.

 

  • Venae Cordis Minimae​​​​​​​:
    • * These are smallest cardiac veins that originate in the heart's substance (the endocardium and deepest layer of the myocardium) and primarily terminate in the atria at the foramina venarum minimarum cordis.

 

  • Fossa Ovalis​​​​​​​​​​​​​​:
    • * Is an oval-shaped depression in the interatrial septum
    • * Represents the site of the foramen ovale, through which blood runs from the right atrium to the left atrium before birth.
    • * The upper-rounded margin of the fossa is called the limbus fossa ovale.

This video is not approved for CME yet. Please check in a few days for the approval result. Thank you for your patience.

Write A New Comment

0 Comments

  • Description:
    • * The right atrium is the right upper chamber of the heart.
    • * Receives venous blood from the whole body, pumps it to the right ventricle through the right atrioventricular or tricuspid opening.
    • * Forms the right border, part of the upper border, the sternocostal surface and base of the heart.
    • * Right atrial pressure is usually slightly lower than the left atrial pressure.
    • * Contains the valve of the IVC and the valve of the coronary sinus.

 

  • Right Auricle:
    • * It is the conical muscular pouch of the upper anterior portion of the right atrium, which covers the first part of the right coronary artery.

 

  • Sinus Venarum:
    • * It is a posteriorly situated, smooth-walled area that is separated from the more muscular atrium proper by the crista terminalis.
    • * Develops from the from the right horn of the sinus venosus and receives the SVC, IVC, coronary sinus, and anterior cardiac veins.

 

  • Pectinate Muscles​​​​​​​:
    • * Are prominent ridges of atrial myocardium located in the interior of both auricles and the right atrium.

 

  • Crista Terminalis​​​​​​​:
    • * Is a vertical muscular ridge running anteriorly along the right atrial wall from the opening of the SVC to the opening of the IVC, providing the origin of the pectinate muscles.
    • * Represents the junction between the primitive sinus venarum and the right atrium proper.

 

  • Venae Cordis Minimae​​​​​​​:
    • * These are smallest cardiac veins that originate in the heart's substance (the endocardium and deepest layer of the myocardium) and primarily terminate in the atria at the foramina venarum minimarum cordis.

 

  • Fossa Ovalis​​​​​​​​​​​​​​:
    • * Is an oval-shaped depression in the interatrial septum
    • * Represents the site of the foramen ovale, through which blood runs from the right atrium to the left atrium before birth.
    • * The upper-rounded margin of the fossa is called the limbus fossa ovale.

Following answers are created by ChatGPT. Occasionally the answer may be harmful, incorrect, false, misleading, incomplete, or limited in knowledge of world. Please contact your doctor for all healthcare decisions. Also, double check the answer provided by the AI below.

Instructors

Please login to access this content.

Don't have an account?

Start Your Free trial

No credit card information needed.

Anatomy (Beta)

Related Videos